Professional Development Committee, Spring Technology Workshop
The Elements of Creating a Web PageHomePreviousNext

Introduction

Planning

Whole site design

Page design

Color and Graphics

Implementation

  • Web site setup
  • Tools
  • Security
  • Testing
  • Maintenance
  • User logs

    Promotion

    Innovation

    Site map


  • Implementation -- Web site setup
    Web pages provide the content, but to deliver this content you also need a computer configured with Web server software and a connection to the Internet (for Harvard sites, a connection to Harvard's High Speed Data Network (HSDN).


    Locate a web server
    Is support for web sites offered by your unit, department, other affiliates? Look at other sites and see what server they use. Internet Service Providers are another option. Is the server adequate? Will the server support everything you want to put on your page? Can it store all the files you will need? Are there any restrictions? Is there 24 hour support?

    You could buy your own server machine and configure the Web server yourself (nailbiter!).

    Get to know your System Administrator!
    Once you have a host for your web site, acquaint yourself with the services and support offered by the host. Will there be someone to help with your questions? What levels of access will you have for web site maintenance?

    Outsource it?
    Hire a consultant, web designer or webmaster to do the dirty work for you. Harvard Computing Society has students available. Ask other sites, webmasters or friends if they know someone who can help. Look at local pages and see who did theirs.

    The Harvard University Web "mistress" (Elaine Benfatto) recently started a project to collect information about outsourcing options used by other webmasters/mistresses at Harvard. Elaine plans to offer this information from the Harvard Home Page (http://www.harvard.edu/)


    Comments? Contact:
    Scott Britton, or
    Martin Hollick, or
    Julie Wetherill
    Copyright 1997, Harvard University. All rights reserved. Revised March 1998TopPreviousNext