HOLLIS Administrative Advisory Committee
Meeting 82
September 18, 1996

CONTENTS:
1. Future of HAAC
2. Kirkland House in HOLLIS
3. Updates
3a. IntraLibrary Loan
3b. Oxford English Dictionary
3c. Finding Aids
3d. Web-Z39.50 Interface
3e. CONSER changes
3f. Indexing changes related to Format Integration
3g. Conclusion of Recon / Demise of OW
3h. New Circ libraries
3i. New HOLLIS Plus resources
3j. Infrastructure issues
4. HOLLIS Enhancements

Attending:

Bob Buckwalter, Marianne Burke, Michael Fitzgerald, Carrie Kent, Kathy Klemperer, Lynne Schmelz (chair), Ann Sitkin, Hinda Sklar, Dorothy Solbrig, Mark Van Baalen, Judy Warnement, Robin Wendler (recording)

Absent: Rod Goins, Ted Pappadopoulos

Future Meetings:

                          November 20, 10:00-12:00 OIS Conference Room 
                          December 18, 10:00-12:00 OIS Conference Room

1. Future of HAAC

Lynne met with Dale to discuss the future of HAAC in the coming year or so, as Harvard libraries gear up for the selection of a new automated system. It seems clear that HAAC still has a role, for example, in the ongoing development of HOLLIS Plus, issues raised by the conclusion of the retrospective conversion project, etc. HAAC will continue to be scheduled for the third Wednesday of the month, and will be canceled when no meeting is needed.

2. Kirkland House in HOLLIS

Judy Warnement, in her role as librarian of Kirkland House, requested authorization to use HOLLIS as the cataloging utility to recatalog the Kirkland House Library. Initially, the project's goal would be to inventory, catalog, and reclassify the collection and eventually to make the information available to Kirkland House residents. The library, run by a staff of 13 students, is restricted to Kirkland House residents, and for this reason, Kirkland House's location would be suppressed from the public catalog. The hope is that HOLLIS II will support virtual local catalogs, which would allow Kirkland's holdings to be visible to its own residents but not to unauthorized users. The collection grows slowly, and due to space problems Judy expects that they will be weeding and transferring materials to Widener or Houghton when appropriate.

There are 11 house libraries, with very different kinds of collections. This proposal deals exclusively with Kirkland House, although some other house libraries may also be interested.

OIS does not foresee any technical difficulty in adding Kirkland House to HOLLIS. The main issues are the precedent which this would set and whether there will be an ongoing commitment to maintain the data in HOLLIS. Marianne Burke preferred that this be considered an exception rather than a precedent -- administering and maintaining small collections in HOLLIS can be a poor cost/benefit trade-off. Carrie Kent felt that the precedent had already been set by the departmental libraries administered in a variety of ways by Widener. Some of these libraries are restricted to key-holders.

The motion was approved.

3. Updates

3a. IntraLibrary Loan

A new IntraLibrary Loan document delivery program involving 19 participating libraries is scheduled to go into production on October 8. IntraLibrary Loan differs from the other patron-request function in HOLLIS, the GET # command. GET # works only on items at the Harvard Depository, works on specific copies and therefore requires item records, has a 24 hour retrieval goal, and delivers materials to the owning library. IntraLibrary Loan uses a variant of the GET # command, GET ANY, which works on materials at all participating libraries, does not require item records, will deliver material to any participating library, and has a delivery goal of 5 days. Materials will be held for pickup from 5 days to 2 weeks, depending on the delivery library. Three libraries are involved in an IntraLibrary Loan transaction: the library of the faculty with which the patron is associated, the library which owns the requested material, and the library where the patron will pick up the material. A later phase of the project will consider delivery of photocopies, but this phase deals with original circulating materials only. A procedures group is developing a manual and other training materials, and there will be open procedures walkthrough meetings on October 1-2.

3b. Oxford English Dictionary

OIS will be acquiring the Open Text search engine and a license for a Web Interface developed at the University of Michigan and use them to provide access to the OED. The OED has been promised for mid-October to support a core class. Open Text will be used for other projects as well, including Finding Aids and possibly access to a variety of Chadwyck-Healey databases. Chadwyck-Healey is also providing their databases via their own server, now called LION (Literature Online), and HCL may beta test this service.

3c. Finding Aids

MacKenzie Smith has been working with Harvard archivists to convert finding aids into SGML. Designing the database in the SiteSearch software proved problematic, so until a longer-term alternative is available, the finding aids will be searchable and viewable using Panorama, a Windows-based web helper application. When Open Text version 6 comes out, the database will be moved and an interface will be developed there.

3d. Web-Z39.50 Interface

OIS has been working with SSHUSH to develop a web interface to Z39.50 databases using OCLC's WebZ software. Environmental Periodicals Bibliography is the highest priority, since no other interface is available for this database, and it is planned for mid-October. FirstSearch databases such as INSPEC are also expected to be made accessible using this interface. OIS plans to try the interface with other Z39.50 databases, such as those available in Eureka, but at this time we don't know how well the WebZ software is optimized for databases running on non-OCLC software. Over time, this type of interface is expected to supplant for many databases the telnet connections currently supported from HOLLIS Plus. Telnet has the disadvantage of requiring the user to have a telnet client correctly installed and to have his web browser configured to find it.

3e. CONSER changes

Changes to the workflow of CONSER participating libraries were recommended by a ULC task force earlier this year. Some changes will be necessary to the programs which convert OCLC and RLIN records before they are loaded into HOLLIS. Training for CONSER libraries in the new procedures is planned for this fall, and OIS will have the programming changes in place by the time training is complete.

3f. Indexing changes related to Format Integration

When the final phase of Format Integration (the consolidation of separate bibliographic formats for books, serials, music, etc. into a single set of MARC tags) took place this past spring, OIS made the changes necessary to support the creation, loading, editing, and export of records with the new characteristics. Since March, catalogers have been able to describe any given item in terms of more than one set of format characteristics, that is, they no longer had to choose a single format for complex or compound materials such as a book with an accompanying diskette, a serial map, or a video of an opera. Yet to be completed are significant changes to HOLLIS indexing to take advantage of the new format. Once the planned indexing changes are complete, users will be able to retrieve an item in a search qualified by any of the formats assigned to the record. This change has extremely wide impact on the system, and basically requires all HOLLIS indexes to be regenerated at the same time and the system to be unavailable for 12 to 24 hours. OIS is aiming for the Thanksgiving weekend as a target when the system can be down without major impact.

3g. Conclusion of Recon / Demise of OW

When the Retrospective Conversion Project ends this December, much of the HOLLIS work that went into making it possible will continue, including the daily pick-up and loading of utility records and the OCLC heading correction process. The major change will be the removal of the OW database. OW now contains just over 50,000 records, down from 1.2 million when recon began. As recon records were added to HU, a program searched for call number matches in OW, and merged location information when a match was found, deleting the OW record. OIS is using a similar strategy to help delete some remaining records in OW for serials which were keyed directly into HU without any searching of the OW database.

When the last recon records are loaded at the end of October, OIS will remove the OW database from the public catalog database selection screen. [This decision has been changed. OW will be removed from the database selection screen between semesters.] The file will still be available in technical services mode, to allow staff to clean up the remainder of the records, deleting them or migrating them into the HU database as appropriate. Eventually, the remaining records will be printed for review and the file completely deleted from HOLLIS. Until that time, however, the Widener call number index (CW), which is shared by the OW and HU databases, will continue to contain OW records, and a patron searching a Widener call number may display an OW record. This does not appear to be a problem, but reference staff should be aware of the possibility.

3h. New Circ libraries

During the summer, Fine Arts and Littauer began using HOLLIS circulation. In January, OIS will be adding Music and Tozzer libraries to HOLLIS circulation.

3i. New HOLLIS Plus resources

The HOLLIS Plus working group has been busy with new resources, particularly new electronic journals which have tended to be packaged together in subscription offers from publishers.

There are now so many electronic journals that HPWG is planning to pull the e-journals category up to the initial HOLLIS Plus screen, where the link will take the user to a list of individual titles, and separating them from other resources on the Alphabetical List of Resources.

OIS has been working on FBIS, which has required the development of a different kind of logon script than we have used before. Bob Buckwalter asked how electronic journals were prioritized by the HPWG, particularly in cases where some journals might be available in print, while others are available only online. Kathy explained that so far prioritization has not been necessary; OIS has been able to take the new resources in order and make them available as quickly as possible. Michael Fitzgerald added that because the journals have tended to come bundled together in publisher deals of dozens of titles, prioritizing individual titles has simply not been an issue.

3j. Infrastructure issues

Kathy explained that these are the things you don't notice, but you would notice if OIS didn't do them. There are two large infrastructure projects underway at this time:

- OIS is about to hire a contract programmer to help convert HOLLIS programs from an unsupported version of IBM mainframe software into a higher, supported version

- HOLLIS Plus has outgrown the programs which support its maintenance, and a new OIS programmer will be taking on the task of redesigning them.

4. HOLLIS Enhancements

The updates on HOLLIS and HOLLIS Plus projects currently underway in OIS served as a lead-in to a new proposal on HOLLIS enhancements. Two years ago, the Harvard library community reached university-wide agreement on a final list of development projects to be completed before we move full swing into the implementation of HOLLIS II. In addition to major development projects, OIS has continued to work on enhancements to HOLLIS based on priorities established by HOLLIS liaisons, although (as was planned) at a decreased rate in the last few years. During the past year, OIS completed very few prioritized HOLLIS enhancements. This is due to several factors: 1) several new development projects were added to the OIS list after being approved through the University Library Council and/or the Automation Planning Committee (e.g. IntraLibrary Loan; support for use of RLG's Diogenes cataloging service); 2) almost all of the remaining prioritized enhancements are significant projects which would require many weeks (if not months) of analysis and programming; and 3) recent staffing shortages.

OIS recommended that we not repeat the enhancement prioritization process again. OIS proposed the following guidelines be used in implementing HOLLIS enhancements between now and the installation of HOLLIS II:

And, of course, if new programmatic initiatives arise and are approved through the normal, appropriate channels (i.e., through ULC, APC, or HAAC), they will be incorporated into the OIS schedule as staffing and resources permit.

HAAC members recognized the limits on OIS resources and the diminishing benefit of enhancements to the existing HOLLIS system, and agreed to the proposal in principle. HAAC asked that OIS present the new policy to the groups and committees involved in the prioritization process (HOLLIS Liaisons, Catalogers' Discussion Group, SSHUSH, Circulation Liaisons, and Acquisitions Roundtable), so that everyone understands what HOLLIS changes they can expect to see in the coming year and that major needs can still be addressed through HAAC, APC, or ULC, and to encourage them to consider desired HOLLIS enhancements when reviewing the work of the HOLLIS II planning committees.


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rev. 11/5/96