• Harvard University
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  • Library Notes
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  • September 2010
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  • No. 1355
Staff Activities Print
 

Andrea Cawelti, Ward Project Music Cataloger at Houghton Library, joins Virginia Danielson, Richard F. French Librarian at the Loeb Music Library, as Harvard College Library contributors to John Ward and His Magnificent Collection (edited by Gordon Hollis, Beverly Hills, CA: Golden Legend, 2010). Cawelti’s article, “An Introduction to the John Milton and Ruth Neils Ward Collections at Harvard University,” outlines the Ward collections at Houghton Library, while Danielson’s article, “A Passage to India: John Ward and the Whole World of Music,” provides an overview of his contributions to resources in ethnomusicology, additionally describing his creation of the Archive of World Music at the Loeb Music Library. An internationally acclaimed musicologist, Ward retired as the William Powell Mason Professor of Music at Harvard University in 1985.

Virginia Hunt, associate university archivist for collection development, University Archives, Harvard University Library, was elected to the Steering Committee of the Acquisition and Appraisal Section for the Society of American Archivists. Her term is for two years, from the end of the 2010 meeting (which took place in August) through the 2012 meeting. Members of the Steering Committee serve on the SAA Nominations and Election Committee for 2011, assist in planning the section meeting program and annual meeting sessions of interest to the section, and actively participate in discussion of section business.

Leslie Morris, curator of modern books and manuscripts in HCL’s Houghton Library, recently presented a paper entitled “Emily Dickinson at Harvard: Past, Present and Future,” at the Emily Dickinson International Society Conference in Oxford, England. The paper was presented as part of a panel discussion that also featured the curators of other major Dickinson collections, including Jane Wald, executive director of the Emily Dickinson Museum, and Mike Kelly, director of special collections at Amherst College.

Karen Nipps, head of the Rare Book Team at Houghton Library, is one of the many contributors to the final volume to appear in print of A History of the Book in America. Nipps’s essay, entitled “A Case Study: Urban Printing,” documents the work of the active 19th-century Philadelphia printer Lydia Bailey. The volume, entitled An Extensive Republic: Print, Culture, and Society in the New Nation, 1790–1840, is actually number two of the much-lauded five-volume series, whose general editor is David D. Hall, Bartlett Research Professor of New England Church History at the Harvard Divinity School. Nipps received two Bryant Fellowships in support of her work on Bailey and is currently putting final touches on a monograph on the same subject.